Roses with Rebecca Altman


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Roses are a sensuous delight, but they also have many healing gifts. In this episode, Rebecca Altman and I discuss the very special gift roses have for reconnecting us with our core selves, even when we’re feeling tense and stressed. We also discuss the physical health benefits of rosehips and you’ll receive Rebecca’s rosehip liqueur recipe.


-- TIMESTAMPS -- 

00:00 - Introduction

02:29 - How Rebecca began working with herbs

06:17 - Practicing herbalism in a major urban center (L.A.) 

08:54 - How wild roses came into Rebecca’s life 

11:15 - The profound emotional healing gifts of wild roses

15:22 - Rebecca’s favorite ways to work with roses

20:50 - The health benefits of rose hips

25:00 - How Rebecca makes rose elixir

27:56 - Rebecca’s rosehip liqueur recipe

29:21 - Rebecca’s course, The Wonder Sessions

32:25 - The power of developing deep relationships with just a few herbs


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Connect with Rebecca


Transcript of the Roses with Rebecca Altman Video

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Hello and welcome to the Herbs with Rosalee podcast. 

Today I'm excited to bring you a conversation with my bestie, Rebecca Altman. Hardly a day goes by that we don't text or call, so we are in constant conversation about life and, of course, plants. One thing I love about Rebecca's approach is her grounded connection to how plants make her feel. She deeply connects with the embodiment of plant medicines. Rebecca loves connecting people to the earth, to plants, to each other, and to themselves. The underlying purpose behind all of her work is to help people remember the wholeness of their being.

She has an online course called The Wonder Sessions, in which she guides people to live a life guided by connection to the self, to nature, and to the web of energy that weaves us all together. Rebecca lives in the mountains of Southern California with her husband, cat, dog, and about a million oak trees. Despite so many reasons not to be, she remains steadfastly hopeful about human beings and this incredible planet. Welcome to the podcast, Rebecca.

Rebecca Altman:

Thanks, Rosalee.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

That sounds funny. Doesn't it, though?

Rebecca Altman:

I know. I stopped myself halfway from calling you your nickname.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Yeah, me, too.

Rebecca Altman:

Yeah.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

But for this show, we'll refrain from nicknames and we'll just go with our full names: Rebecca...

Rebecca Altman:

Yes.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Rosalee. We'll pretend that's what we always say. Well, welcome. I'm so happy you could be on the podcast. Obviously it's a delight for me to be interviewing you and your brilliance here and sharing that with everyone. I feel like I get a front row seat to your brilliance every day of my life. Now I get to share it with others. So thank you.

Rebecca Altman:

That's wonderful. And I am so grateful to be here. I am, not only your bestie, but also a massive admirer of your work. And so it's just a joy and a pleasure.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Aw. All right. Well, we'll just be like all lovey dovey.

Rebecca Altman:

I know, tell me more nice things about myself.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Tell me more. Well, you could tell me how you got started on this wonderful healing path of yours.

Rebecca Altman:

I got started like I think many people are drawn to herbs, because I wasn't well, and I was in a really difficult place mentally. And I was in the process of withdrawing from taking five different psychiatric medications. And I was really not doing well.

I found herbs in a sort of roundabout way because I had started doing yoga classes every day. And I needed a very structured routine in order to get through this period of my life. And I walked into a yoga class one day and a man, who was lying on the floor, looked up at me and he said, "Do you want a job?" And I went, "Yeah, what do you do?" He was a herbalist. And he had a little herb shop in Palm Desert and he took me under his wing and he taught me how to read tongues and pulses.

And we went out hiking together. And it was actually when we went out hiking together that he would just start pointing out different herbs and he'd be like, "Oh, that's desert lavender. And that's ocotillo" and it was that experience of being out in the desert. And I started just hiking every day and getting out there.

And I think I'm not alone in being a person who sort of starts getting out into nature more and more and realizes how healing it is just to be there. And so it was through that every single day, going out to the same trail, to the same places. And then I would start looking at the plants and then I would start bringing home pieces of the plants and going on Google and typing in purple flower, Palm Desert, and then scrolling through thousands and thousands of images until I found it, and then found the name and then looking up medicinal properties, and then it was through doing that that I found Michael Moore's books.

At this time in my life, I had no idea that there was a whole herbal community out there. I was just walking in the desert and picking plants and doing an hours-long Google image search, and then looking at their properties and then drying them and then experimenting on strangers like, "Hi, you don't know me, but I heard you talking about your stomach issues. Would you like to try this herb?"

And that's how I got into it. And it was really kind of funny because at the time my boyfriend, now husband, we were living together and I was going through this phase in my life where I was like, "I don't have a thing." Everyone I know was in college and had a thing they were studying and had a path, a life path. And I was like, "I don't have a path. I don't have a thing. I don't know what the hell I'm doing with my life."

And he sort of points at this wall behind me... at this point it's full of herb books and jars full of dried herbs. And he's like, "I think you have a thing." And I was like, "Oh, I have a thing." So I sort of stumbled upon it, but happily.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

And so had you moved to LA at this point?

Rebecca Altman:

At this point, this was still in Palm Desert, but we moved to LA very soon after that.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Yeah. I feel like knowing of LA, from Hollywood before I had friends and an actual knowledge of LA, I didn't realize how LA is surrounded by all sorts of wilderness and trails. And so it's an interesting thing but I remember hearing LA herbalist, it's like, "Yeah, how could you live in such an urban center," but well, there's so much plant life in the urban center, too, but also surrounded by so many beautiful things.

Rebecca Altman:

Surrounded. That was a really healing thing for me as well, I think, to sort of transfer that going out into the desert every day to going for walks around LA every day, and finding things like the sort of native plant gardens that people had planted.

And I think one of the happiest moments for me was seeing that somebody had planted yarrow and it had spread and you could see the progress of the yarrow down 1st Street, which was the street I lived next to. And you could see that it started here, and there was basically a lawn. And then you could see clumps of it as it had spread year by year.

And I was just like, "Oh, it's everywhere. It doesn't need to be in this pristine wilderness, out a two hour drive from here. It's like plant life grows. That's what it does." And that's what's so healing is that earth energy and the plant energy that comes up and through anywhere.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

And maybe even, especially that more Southern climate because, when I visited you, I remember I would just walk around and around and around and just be amazed at the rosemary hedges and jacaranda trees and seeing a flowering jade plant. I mean, I just kept walking for the plants. So it's just amazing to see so much plant life.

Rebecca Altman:

It's amazing.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Especially when I go down there in January and it's all covered in snow up here.

Rebecca Altman:

Yeah, totally. And then January, LA starting to come into bloom and the orange blossoms and there's ginkgo trees and sweet gums and it's everywhere. It's everywhere. It's a really, really lush city that, I don't think, especially in the herbal community, I used to meet people and they would be like, "LA?"

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Yeah, that was me.

Rebecca Altman:

You need to come and visit.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Yeah, it's pretty amazing. Yeah. So do you remember meeting wild rose for the first time or when wild rose first started to come into your life?

Rebecca Altman:

Yes, it was actually around that same period of time with the yarrow, when I was hiking in Topanga Canyon, which is a canyon that is, I think it's actually still considered within LA city limits, but it's wild. And it's in the Santa Monica mountains and I was hiking and smelled it and then went hunting. And, if I'm being honest, the Google image search thing, still my primary plant identification method, just because, so, you know how some people learn to type with one finger and no matter how much they write, they type with one finger? I learned to identify plants with image searches and I know how to use other methods, but it's my one finger typing that is my most comfortable. So maybe I shouldn't be admitting that, but it is.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

There's something to be said for the visual.

Rebecca Altman:

Yeah. The visual. It works. It's my one finger typing and that was the first time I ever met wild rose. And then after that, I started seeing it everywhere because it actually grows in almost all of the places that I hike and have been hiking for years, but it was in Topanga that I first was introduced to it. And I think it's so interesting as well. It came into my life and I noticed this... I think, I assume that I'm not the only person for whom plants come into our lives when we need them. I know I'm not the only person.

And it's this... Such a strange and wondrous thing about our relationship with plants because it's like, I don't know, sometimes something will start growing in your garden and you're like, "How did this even get here? I have no idea." And then it starts to grow and you find out what it is. And you're like, "Are you a messenger? Are you coming to tell me something?"

And wild rose was that for me. Because I think wild rose has so many different medicinal properties, many of them physical, but I know that for me personally, and I think quite a lot of herbalists, the emotional effects of wild rose are really so profound.

I started thinking of it as this remedy for LA because LA is hot and dry and choleric and it's aggressive and everyone is in a hurry and everyone is aggravated by the other people in the city who are impeding their natural fast progression towards something. And so everything is like, "Get out of my way. Don't you know who I am and I am so important and this is really, really important." And you can see my face and hands are getting all tense and my shoulders are getting all tense.

And that was me in LA, but also everyone I saw. And I found that, at first, I think my relationship with rose, it was more just about softening and relaxing. And whenever I would... I've always been an experimenter and always with people as well. So you know that, "Excuse me, I overheard you talking about your stomach," that never stops. And I'd be like, "Excuse me, I overheard you or excuse me, I see that you have very tense shoulders. Will you try three drops of this?" Okay, that's not entirely true. It was at farmer's markets when I was selling things. So people actually did walk up to me. I wasn't completely herb evangelizing.

Just to clarify, I waited for somebody to say hello first. And then I would start giving people three drops of rose elixir because I love low doses as you and I have discussed. And I would watch people soften, their foreheads would relax and their shoulders would relax and people would start tearing up. And not tearing up because they were being made miserable, but tearing up because it's like all of a sudden, energy was flowing again.

And over the years of working with it, more and more and deeper and deeper, because I think it's probably the plant I work with the most, I have started to think of it as a plant that reconnects us with our heart, with the heart of who we are. And it sort of relaxes the parts of us that we hold so tightly that prevent us from reconnecting with our heart selves.

And the reason, I think, that it often brings such a deep emotional reaction is that what people are feeling is themselves. And if you've been tensing and bracing and pushing and feeling so stressed and so, in some ways, traumatized by life, and then all of a sudden you feel this is connection to the deepest, oldest part of you that is okay... and that's like bright and shiny and whole and open and deeply connected to the world around you. The only thing to do is to cry because it's like a remembrance. I think so many of us need that. Yeah. It sort of became that. That was a journey that I went on for myself and rose was sort of my usher.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Hmm. And when working with rose, you mentioned rose elixir and what other ways do you like to invite rose into your life?

Rebecca Altman:

My favorite way? Sitting with the plant. I don't know if any of the people listening, if you ever have an opportunity to go and sit in or next to, if you don't want to be stabbed, a patch of wild roses, when it's in bloom on a warm summer evening... even the scent does things to you. It's like it unravels your being. And the lived experience of that is, I think, so profound because it's such an amazing way to show or to see how mind-altering plants can actually be, even without ingesting them.

Like this is just sitting in the presence of a being and it's a really small and unassuming being. Like this isn't one of the power plants that people talk about and think of as wisdom plants or powerful plants, and they're talked about like they're really, really important, and this is just little old wild rose, it's like scrappy and...

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Brambly, scrappy, thorny.

Rebecca Altman:

If you approach it too quickly, it's going to kick your butt. And it's not glamorous or expensive, it grows in so many different places. I've seen it in multiple countries and multiple places that I've visited and it's just unassuming. And so the experience of that, I think, is really incredible.

But then another way that I love rose is bathing in rose. Like make a nice infusion of rose petals and you don't need to steep it for very long at all. And then strain that into a bath. That's beautiful. You can add some rose water to it if you want more of the scent. If you have absolute or essential oil lying around and don't mind literally pouring money down the drain, a couple of drops of that. And the experience of being surrounded in a bath of rose, it feels like a hug. And then adding rose water to various foods is wonderful as well.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

And by rose water, just to clarify, you mean like a rose hydrosol or like the culinary rose water? 

Rebecca Altman:

Yes.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Yeah.

Rebecca Altman:

Thank you. Yes. Yes. Culinary rose hydrosol, I use a lot, I mean, culinary rose water that you can buy at a grocery store.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

I love that so much of what you've shared is like that saying of, "Stop and smell the roses." But what you've shared is just this much... eloquent, deeper, you could just offhandedly say like, "Oh yeah, stop and smell the roses." There's something of a saying, and then there's something about the embodiment of it. And what does that mean to spend time with the rose?

Rebecca Altman:

That's so true. Wow. Never thought of that. That's really cool.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

And so there's the rose petals. Of course, they tend to bloom kind of springish depending where you live, late spring, and they are so sensual, so aromatic. And then as those get pollinated and ripen, they turn into these beautiful rose hips. And I know your recipe that you're sharing with everyone today is a rose hip liqueur. You want to say anything about that for us? Enticing words of yumminess...

Rebecca Altman:

Enticing words, no pressure.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

No pressure.

Rebecca Altman:

Where I live here, our rose hips are incredibly fragrant. Oh, okay, fragrant's the wrong word, but they taste very strongly of rose. And it just occurred to me that I have not tasted rose hips in other places. So I was about to say, well, rose hips and they taste so strongly of rose. And then I was like, I don't know if that's true. So that was why I had a stop and wait a minute.

However, I think the entire plant is medicinal. And I find that I'll often, when I make a rose elixir, I will gather different parts of the plant over the course of the year. And so I'll gather the rose hips and then gather the leaves and flowers and I feel that sort of gives a much more complete rose experience.

Once I even made a rose thorn elixir. I was feeling particularly stabby but yeah, the rose hips... I think traditionally, rose hips are actually much more used in many countries and many cultures. They're easy to preserve. They don't bloom and disappear in a couple of weeks. They're on the plant for a long time. And so they are, in many ways, easier to have access to because if you don't actually live next to a patch of wild rose, sometimes you can miss it. But rose hips are there for a while and they do carry or have the same properties as the rose plant. Except the rose hips are more nutritional. They're very high in vitamin C and I think you are actually probably more knowledgeable than me on the different things that...

Rosalee de la Forêt:

The whole property...

Rebecca Altman:

Yeah. And then I looked at you like "Oh, that's right?" Right?

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Absolutely right. I heard a lot of stuff. Like it's very high in antioxidants, so yeah. Beta carotenes, as well. Yeah. That's one thing that is a little bit of a pet peeve for me, with rose hips, is that sometimes people get so focused on the vitamin C that they forget that there's so many nutrients. I mean, rose hips are nutrient dense. There's a lot in there. Not just one constituent.

So yes, rose hips are high in vitamin C and if you eat them right off the plant, they're really high in vitamin C. But once you dry them, once you cook them, the vitamin C is going to decrease in each step of that. But that's okay. Because there's lots of yummy goodness in rose hips, not just the one thing. And that's from the physical standpoint, not even from all of the other wonderful gifts within it.

Rebecca Altman:

And they have healthy oils, right?

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Yeah. The seeds do, which need to be pressed with special equipment. So that's another thing people will ask, "Can I infuse the seeds into oil?" That's not how rose hip oil is made. It needs to be pressed with equipment. Yeah. But absolutely. People love their rose hip oil. I do. I add it a lot to my product.

Rebecca Altman:

I love it. I knew that they were incredible nutrition, but yes, I don't remember the things that I read about them. I'm trying to remember.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Remembering the things that you feel. And yeah, it's interesting, too, just talking about rose and talking about that kind of LA syndrome that you were talking about, tense shoulders and tenseness and hurriedness and all that kind of thing. And when I think of rose and rose hips and rose petals, I think, it modulates inflammation, that's like the practical side of it. But I can see working on these various levels, like working with rose hips actually does reduce inflammatory levels in the body, like C-reactive protein. So those are the things I remember, but then it's from your embodiment and experienced point of view, it's this modulating of this energetic inflammation of, "Arrrrggghhh."

Rebecca Altman:

That, yeah. I love that. Like the confluence of how the truth of the being of rose and then you can look at it through different lenses and still find the same. Yeah. That's really cool.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Yeah. Yeah. So I wanted to just circle back real quick to you're talking about making a rose hip elixir with all the parts, how do you practically go about doing that? What is your process? Because those parts are ready at different times of the year.

Rebecca Altman:

So let's say... I said before, I start with the rose hips. So we'll start with rose hips. You gather the rose hips and let's say half fill. No, let's just say you'll fill a jar with brandy. You'll gather the rose hips and fill the jar to about half full with rose hips and then fill the jar with brandy or let's say brandy and honey. If you want specifics, 75% brandy, 25% honey. I'll mix it all in a giant jar and shake it up and wait for the honey to dissolve in the brandy. And I'll just fill the jar of rose hips with that.

Then in six months, when the roses start blooming, I would go and gather the rose petals and pick the leaves, as well. If you find, when you're gathering wild roses, if you smell the leaves and they smell fragrant and you can taste them.

And if it doesn't smell of nothing, basically then gather some of the leaves, as well. And you gather some of the wee thorns, as well. Divide it between two jars and then I just like split the rose hip jar in between these two. So then you've now got two jars with the rose hips and the petals and leaves and thorns all infusing. So it's just basically you start it in the autumn and then continue it in the late spring when the rest of it is in bloom.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

I like that you're adding it all together because there's that synergy and coming together of everything. So it's not just making them separate, but combining them together. And, I like that you're using the leaves too, because that's not really part... People often ask me about leaves and leaves are not something I've really worked with in the rose plants, but now next time I have roses out there, I'll be smelling the leaves and seeing if we have fragrant leaves here.

Rebecca Altman:

I like the idea of just using the whole plant and having everything together. It's more like the symbolism, I think, of it for me than anything, is like all parts of you are welcome here, which I think it's important to me. It's like inclusivity, which it sounds silly when talking about the parts of a plant, but I feel when you apply it on a micro level, it starts to expand to all parts of ourselves and other people. And I think it's...I don't know. I like it.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Yeah. It's beautiful. And for people who want to make something with rose a little bit more simply, we have the rose hip liqueur recipe, which is using the rose hips, specifically, to make beautiful, wonderful medicine with.

Rebecca Altman:

Which you... if you live in the northern hemisphere, you should be able to find rose hips now.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Right about now. Yeah. For the listeners, as you probably know by now, I love to share recipes when we talk about these plants. Recipes are a wonderful way for you to get involved and create your own experience with herbs, because it’s one thing to hear someone else talk about rose but an entirely other thing to form your own relationship with this plant through observing, tending, and, of course, tasting. And what better way to do that than with Rebecca’s recipe for rosehip liqueur? You can download your recipe card using the link above this transcript. Well, Rebecca... still sounds funny. So we have nicknames for each other, so saying full names sounds funny, but trying to be professional, which I think I just totally blew, but Rebecca...

Rebecca Altman:

Yes, Rosalee?

Rosalee de la Forêt:

What projects do you have going on right now in your life and healing journey?

Rebecca Altman:

The main project I have going on right now is that I am finally after...oh my goodness, a year and a half of sort of re-working it and really sort of taking some time to consolidate and figure out how I want it to look and feel, finally reopening my course, The Wonder Sessions. It's my main offering and my main project and where I sort of spend the bulk of my time and energy is teaching people how to connect with themselves and nature and the larger flow of energy in the world.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

I love that. Then I love The Wonder Sessions myself and tapping into what is already there around us, seeing that deeper web of connection and how we already fit into it.

Rebecca Altman:

I think it's really important, and something that so many of us seem to forget, as we go about our lives and our very stressful business and that sort of, I call it the web. And I know that there are other names for it in other cultures and traditions. My experience of it has always felt like a web. And so I call it the web and it's like this web of energy that flows through absolutely everything in existence and the more stressed we get, the more we stop noticing it.

So I think it's really important and helpful to sort of teach people to reconnect to it, to remember how connected to it we are, and to help people weave themselves back into the natural flow of energy in the world. And I think what happens as a result of that is this remembrance of the wholeness of our being and feels like important things to remember right now.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Absolutely. I'm very excited for you in this next offering of The Wonder Sessions for everyone. Before we go, I have my last question that I ask everybody in season two. And that question is: What has surprised you along your herbal journey?

Rebecca Altman:

Oh, how little I need. And I mean that, in the sense of when I first started learning about plants, I wanted to learn about every single plant under the sun. And I wanted to know every single plant under the sun. It was like walking into a party and wanting to be best friends with everyone.

After a while, I've been practicing and playing with plants for, goodness, how long? Close to 20 years. I think the thing that really stands out to me is that you don't need to have a million best friends. You can have a few best friends. Just one best friend for everything. Only one, just me, but you can have a few.

And the closer you become to them, the more you can do with them, the more you can ask of them. It's sort of like any relationship where the longer that you know somebody, the more facets you see of them and, you can be friends with somebody or know somebody for 20 years and then one day they'll do something and you'll be like, "Holy crap. I just had no idea that you could do that."

Or, they tell you a story about something in their childhood and you see them in a completely different light. And plants are like that. The longer you get to know someone, the more that you start to go, "Oh, wait, rose, I can use rose here. Oh, I can use rose here. No, I can can use rose here. Oh, I didn't know that I could use rose here, but rose is asking me to come and play here. So I'm going to use rose here."

And so I used to think that I needed a million plant best friends and the longer I practice, the more that I'm just like five, ten... I use the same plants over and over and over. And my relationship with them deepens. And it's not that I'm not interested in new friends, but I'm really very, very satisfied with the plant friendships I have.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

I love that. I just have this memory of when I was in herb school back in the day, I think we had to do 400 herbs in order to finish school. And I totally had flashcards and I just memorized what was on the flashcard and I loved it. Like, I'm not going to lie: I loved it. And I loved that idea of knowing so many plants.

But the practice of it, all that knowledge of memorizing flashcards fell away so quickly after I was done studying for the test. And really, what happened was I, as you so beautifully said, had those deep relationships with a few plants and they're not always the plants that grow around me, but for the most part they are plants that I actually get to interact with, not just order. There are some special ones there, too, that I don't always get to hang out with, but yeah. So beautifully and eloquently said that… the few plant friends, deeper relationships.

Rebecca Altman:

Yeah. In Chinese medical school, we had a lot of herbs to learn as well. And I remember just feeling, as you know, and as everyone has just heard, I don't remember details and facts very well at all, but I remember feelings. And so the learning of hundreds of herbs was the first time in my life I've ever failed a class–ever–because it's just my body couldn't learn that many things. And it was really difficult for me.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

I just had this vision of system overdrive or something.

Rebecca Altman:

Totally.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Too much too much.

Rebecca Altman:

Trying to taste like 20 herbs in one day. And I'm like, "I don't even know what's going on in my body right now."

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Yeah. Well, that is a wonderful, surprising thing to realize. And one such born of experience and wisdom, too. And I do not feel bad that I was really into learning all the plants, but it definitely came just naturally to really focus on those few. Well, thank you for that. Pointing that out. Yeah. And thanks for being here today, Rebecca, and sharing your rose embodiment and wisdom and energetics. I really appreciate you taking the time, hanging out with me. I'm so excited to share this conversation with everyone and thanks so much for being here.

Rebecca Altman:

Thank you so much for having me here on your podcast, Rosalee. It's been an absolute pleasure to get to talk to you about plants.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Thanks, Rebecca.

Rebecca Altman:

And to not use your nickname.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

All right, we'll go back to that right after this.

Rebecca Altman:

Okay.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Thanks, Rebecca.

Rebecca Altman:

Thanks, Rosalee.

Rosalee de la Forêt:

Don't forget to click the link above this transcript to get free access to Rebecca's rose hip liqueur. You can also visit Rebecca directly at www.wonderbotanica.com. Before you go, be sure to subscribe to my newsletter below so you’ll be the first to get my new videos, including interviews like this. I’d also love to hear your thoughts about this interview and your relationship with rose. Leave your comments below. I deeply believe that this world needs more herbalists and plant-centered folks. I'm so glad you are here as a part of this herbal community. Have a beautiful day.


Rosalee is an herbalist and author of the bestselling book Alchemy of Herbs: Transform Everyday Ingredients Into Foods & Remedies That Heal and co-author of the bestselling book Wild Remedies: How to Forage Healing Foods and Craft Your Own Herbal Medicine. She's a registered herbalist with the American Herbalist Guild and has taught thousands of students through her online courses. Read about how Rosalee went from having a terminal illness to being a bestselling author in her full story here.  



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